How your presentation looks

Does your presentation look good. If you don’t know what the audience prefers or have never presented for this audience before, test some slides with a representative of the audience or someone who knows the audience well.
Choose a slide background and colors that are appropriate for the audience and comfortable for you. If you don’t know what the audience prefers or have never presented for this audience before, test some slides with a representative of the audience or someone who knows the audience well.

The slide background should also be appropriate for the viewing environment. For dark rooms, light text on dark backgrounds works well; for light rooms, dark text on a light or clear background may be more readable. Apply the same style to each slide.

Avoid visual clutter, such as excessive use of clipart or cartoons. Sometimes a touch of humor can be an effective way to connect with your audience, but use humor only if you know it is appropriate for the audience, country, and situation.

Follow the rule: Keep It Short and Simple.

Show key points only—the full message should be in your speech.

Use short words and short phrases. A good rule to follow is to have no more than six words per line and six lines per overhead (not counting the title).Include one idea per overhead. Use more than one slide if you have several related points.

Use strong statements; use action verbs to describe next steps or policy implications.Show one slide per minute as a general rule, but try to vary the speed at which you show slides.

Round off numbers on graphs and in text, unless the decimal point is critical (such as for fertility data).

Use special effects such as animation sparingly, only to enhance your presentation.Too many visual effects can distract audiences from your message. Use animation only if you or the person assisting with slides can practice the slide show in advance. If you are preparing a presentation for someone else, it is safer to leave the animation out. Add a last slide (blank or with a photo) to signal the end of the slide show to the presenter and audience.


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